My Best Crowdfunding Advice

    There are tons of places to get so-called crowdfunding advice. Most of those people offer tidbits of advice and charge for the full course. Easily, by far, the best place to go for how to run and publicize a crowdfunding campaign is Seed&Spark, more specifically, this class Emily Best and her team put out.
    Yes, your campaign might not be a movie, but many of the points cross-over.
    Beyond that, here’s one really useful trick I’ve discovered. Find a domain  (URL/web address/domain name) that fits your campaign, is easy to say, easy to remember, and easy to spell. For ALGORITHM, my movie about computer hackers, I choose www.theHackerMovie.com. It’s descriptive of what the movie is about, and fits all the aforementioned criteria.
    For my current project, Intelligent Design is a series about realistic science fiction and spies, so I bought www.SciFiandSpies.com.
    There are a lot of choices of where to buy your domain. I now swear by Google Domains. They’re about $3 more expensive than some of their competition, but they’re easily worth it. Here’s why:
1. Google is hosts a major DNS (domain name server) which a lot of system administrators (people who make the computer work that make the Internet work) use as the default DNS. Here’s why that matters: When you buy a domain name, you have to tell the registrar where you want to point the domain name. It takes about 48 hours for domain names to propagate to every DNS around the world. Unless it’s Google.
2. Rather than permanently directing your URL to a specific place (this is critical for reasons I’ll get into), Google Domains allows you to easily do a temporary redirect. That means anytime you want the domain name to point somewhere else, it takes no time to propagate the DNS update because the primary DNS info never changes.
3. There may be times when you want your main URL to point somewhere, but you also have side things you want to highlight. Enter: temporary subdomain redirects. As I’m typing this, www.SciFiandSpies.com points to the Kickstarter campaign for the project, and it needs to stay there for the duration of the campaign. But, I also need a place to direct press inquiries. So, for no extra charge, I created a subdomain redirect: press.SciFiandSpies.com. I also created a real-world social media game which is at: game.SciFiandSpies.com. I don’t know if there’s a limit to these subdomain redirects, but I’ve made three without a problem.
4. Email redirecting. A lot of places charge for email addresses. Google Domains gives you 100 free email address redirects for each registered URL. You can then redirect all emails to any address you want, including free Gmail accounts. This is really useful for temporary topical addresses. For instance, when I was setting up auditions for www.SciFiandSpies.com I created auditions@SciFiandSpies.com. Once auditions were full, I don’t want to receive those kinds of emails anymore so I disabled that address.

I’ve been skating around an idea that is actually the primary motivation for writing this. The main innovation I’ve realized is that by owning a good domain name and hosting it on Google Domains, the domain name can be redirected to whatever page I want, anytime, forever. Anytime someone embeds the domain name in a post, that gets redirected too. Anytime it gets mentioned in a news report, a blog, Facebook, Twitter, or anywhere else, all that traffic goes where I want it to go at the moment.
    When I first bought www.SciFiandSpies.com it went to the page that’s now press.SciFiandSpies.com. Now, it points to the Kickstarter campaign. When the campaign finishes, I’ll probably redirect it again to press.SciFiandSpies.com. The point is, it goes wherever I want, the moment I want it to. It’s about branding and directing traffic.
    Anyway, that’s what I’ve got. I hope it helps you!

    There are tons of places to get so-called crowdfunding advice. Most of those people offer tidbits of advice and charge for the full course. Easily, by far, the best place to go for how to run and publicize a crowdfunding campaign is Seed&Spark, more specifically, this class Emily Best and her team put out.
    Yes, your campaign might not be a movie, but many of the points cross-over.
    Beyond that, here’s one really useful trick I’ve discovered. Find a domain  (URL/web address/domain name) that fits your campaign, is easy to say, easy to remember, and easy to spell. For ALGORITHM, my movie about computer hackers, I choose www.theHackerMovie.com. It’s descriptive of what the movie is about, and fits all the aforementioned criteria.
    For my current project, Intelligent Design is a series about realistic science fiction and spies, so I bought www.SciFiandSpies.com.
    There are a lot of choices of where to buy your domain. I now swear by Google Domains. They’re about $3 more expensive than some of their competition, but they’re easily worth it. Here’s why:
1. Google is hosts a major DNS (domain name server) which a lot of system administrators (people who make the computer work that make the Internet work) use as the default DNS. Here’s why that matters: When you buy a domain name, you have to tell the registrar where you want to point the domain name. It takes about 48 hours for domain names to propagate to every DNS around the world. Unless it’s Google.
2. Rather than permanently directing your URL to a specific place (this is critical for reasons I’ll get into), Google Domains allows you to easily do a temporary redirect. That means anytime you want the domain name to point somewhere else, it takes no time to propagate the DNS update because the primary DNS info never changes.
3. There may be times when you want your main URL to point somewhere, but you also have side things you want to highlight. Enter: temporary subdomain redirects. As I’m typing this, www.SciFiandSpies.com points to the Kickstarter campaign for the project, and it needs to stay there for the duration of the campaign. But, I also need a place to direct press inquiries. So, for no extra charge, I created a subdomain redirect: press.SciFiandSpies.com. I also created a real-world social media game which is at: game.SciFiandSpies.com. I don’t know if there’s a limit to these subdomain redirects, but I’ve made three without a problem.
4. Email redirecting. A lot of places charge for email addresses. Google Domains gives you 100 free email address redirects for each registered URL. You can then redirect all emails to any address you want, including free Gmail accounts. This is really useful for temporary topical addresses. For instance, when I was setting up auditions for www.SciFiandSpies.com I created auditions@SciFiandSpies.com. Once auditions were full, I don’t want to receive those kinds of emails anymore so I disabled that address.

I’ve been skating around an idea that is actually the primary motivation for writing this. The main innovation I’ve realized is that by owning a good domain name and hosting it on Google Domains, the domain name can be redirected to whatever page I want, anytime, forever. Anytime someone embeds the domain name in a post, that gets redirected too. Anytime it gets mentioned in a news report, a blog, Facebook, Twitter, or anywhere else, all that traffic goes where I want it to go at the moment.
    When I first bought www.SciFiandSpies.com it went to the page that’s now press.SciFiandSpies.com. Now, it points to the Kickstarter campaign. When the campaign finishes, I’ll probably redirect it again to press.SciFiandSpies.com. The point is, it goes wherever I want, the moment I want it to. It’s about branding and directing traffic.
    Anyway, that’s what I’ve got. I hope it helps you!